Bourdain returns to conflict zone for Parts Unknown

Ahead of the April 26 launch of season 5 of Parts Unknown, the well-known chef, Anthony Bourdain, answered a few questions from National Geographic.

Q: If you weren’t living in New York, where would you want to call home?

A: I’ve thought about it a lot; I ponder what it would be like to live in Sardinia or [somewhere else in] Italy. My wife is Italian and she has family there—even places to live if she wanted to.

But I’m kidding myself. I’m a workaholic, I love my job, and I think I’m hardwired to New York, so as much as I’d like to spend time elsewhere, I’d be deluding myself if I thought that I’d ever retire to a hilltop in Tuscany.

But, if everything went wrong in my life and I ended up alone and drinking too much, then I’d probably head to Vietnam.

In addition, Bourdain will be returning to Beirut, where he and his crew were back in 2006 when they experienced conflict:

Q: In the fifth season of Parts Unknown, you’re heading back to Beirut, Lebanon, where you and your crew got caught in the middle of a conflict in 2006. What made you decide to go back?

A: I felt that there was always unfinished business. I was having an extraordinarily positive time there until the war broke out and I felt that there was, there is, and there will always be a much more interesting, much more multidimensional, much more positive side to show of Lebanon.

Anthony Bourdain on location in Beirut (with the Lebanon chapter of the Harley Davidson Owners Group) as he films “Parts Unknown.” (Photograph by David S. Holloway, CNN)
Anthony Bourdain on location in Beirut (with the Lebanon chapter of the Harley Davidson Owners Group) as he films “Parts Unknown.” (Photograph by David S. Holloway, CNN)
It’s a very complex, uniquely incredible place—it’s one of my favorite cities—and for all of its problems, and there are many, I think it’s a place that people should go and enjoy themselves.

I’m fascinated by it and everyone on my crew loves the place, so to go back and tell other aspects of that story—I’ll do that at every opportunity. It hasn’t been examined anywhere near as caringly and as carefully as it deserves.

You can read the full Q&A at National Geographic.


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